Walter Bosley: Hell’s Bells

When I met Walter in 2001, he was a recently retired Air Force officer. Others shied away when they learned that he was in the Air Force Office of Special Investigations, but I knew I had to talk to him. Since then, we have been on adventures in the desert looking for haunted cemeteries, making documentary films and talking about UFO, paranormal and spy stuff on this program. Since I met him, Walter has authored three books, a few screenplays, and taught classes in surveillance work.

In the last couple of years, his interests have expanded and he is poised to premiere his first feature film, shot almost literally on a shoestring budgetHell’s Bells is a black and white silent movie shot on hi-def video. We talked about the experience of making the film, but of course were compelled to wander into other subjects.

Also discussed: Russian spies on the Manhattan Project, silly infighting amongst the UFO fan and media community, crop circle hoaxes, why we don’t enjoy politics, Anthony Bourdain’s travel series and Cory McAbee (one of my favorite filmmakers.)

 

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15 comments on “Walter Bosley: Hell’s Bells

  1. Red Pill Junkie on said:

    Those 2 dames at the top reminded me of this case, for some reason.

  2. Laurence Zankowski on said:

    Everything goes on hold when Walter and you get together.

    Here is a question: was there any nuclear testing going on during the Roswell event(s),if Roswell event actually happened.

    Second, if testing was happening, was there any reports of what we now call EMP, in or around that area. The standard radio disruption, phone line, teletype, mechanical failure of anytype?

    Third, I do not believe an answer of truth will be coming about weapons testing or ordnance destruction.

    Fourth, any idea about when directed energy weapons testing / research began?

    The 30s? 40s?, 50s? Tesla research is included in this query.

    Be well

    Laurence

  3. drew hempel on said:

    Ha — my old best friend used to live in a house with Babes in Toyland.

  4. drew hempel on said:

    http://www.youtube.com/verify_age?next_url=/watch%3Fv%3DE-1G9NiUI9o

    This new doc “The Forgotten Bomb” is really good.

  5. drew hempel on said:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zuZmhb5yrsI&feature=youtu.be

    Brilliant doc here debunking Ancient Aliens. Enjoy.

  6. Hey you were talking about the Anthony Bourdain shows, and I think you should try the one when he comes out to the Mojave Desert and meets up with Queen of the Stone Age head singer. He takes him to resturant’s, bars, recording studio and even the Integratron. It was just last season. Hes also gone out to Palm Springs and gone to the Date orchards and looked at the Palm Tree fields.

  7. Matt McKenzie on said:

    The two chicks on that poster are absolutely fascinating. Especially the one on the left. I think I’m developing some kind of weird obsession with them.

  8. Indridi I. Kaldtsen on said:

    Laurence,

    According to http://www.wsmr-history.org/FiringRecords1947.asp (non-military White Sands Testing Range Museum), these projects were on-going at the firing range in 1947:

    Aerobee
    Corporal
    Hermes
    Nike Dummy
    Nike Research
    Roto Retriever
    V-2
    WAC Corporal

    These were all US Army projects. The V-2 project with Paperclip people was the main event there in ’47. The list is partially corraborated at http://www.project1947.com/roswell/wspg.htm Nike and Corporal are both missile systems. Nike used three different kinds of radar, and there is a Roswell rumor that strange early-days high-powered radar brought the craft down. Aerobee was a cosmic-ray detector project by Bell Telephone, which also had a hand in Nike, with Caltech working on Nike.

    According to the White Sands museum site, only WAC Corporal had firings on the range in June, 1947, but there were two V-2 firings and one Corporal in July, 1947.

    According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_testing the US only conducted six nuclear tests before the USSR detonated their first nuke in 1949. According to wikipedia, there is a nuclear-testing gap in 1947, with Operation Cross-Roads at Bikini Atoll in 1946 followed by Operation Sandstone at Enewetok Atoll in 1948, after which the Operation Ranger tests were moved to the Nevada Test Site in 1951. The Operation Crossroads Charlie test was scheduled for 1947 in the Pacific but morphed into Project Wigwam, only carried out in 1955 about 500 miles SW of San Diego, California. The Davy Crockett tactical nuclear mortars and rounds were developed in the late 50s and tested at Nevada in ’61, according to wikipedia. Operation Argus in 1958 was the name for the testing of three lower-yield uranium/plutonium sealed-pit nukes in near-space, 200 km over the South Atlantic. Beta-decay of fission material produced electron streams capable of damaging electronics and radar in the Argus test.

    Of course, not all tests were reported.

  9. Walter Bosley on said:

    If you’re in Southern California on Nov 25th, come see the movie! You will also be in the first audience to see the trailer for the new full-length feature I’m starting next week…

  10. Walter Bosley on said:

    http://nobudgetcinema.blogspot.com/p/hells-bells-premier-event.html

  11. Indridi I. Kaldtsen on said:

    Laurence,

    You might also find some information about your Tesla question in this film at archive.org:

    http://archive.org/details/The-Eye-of-the-Storm_The-Inventions-of-Nikola-Tesla

  12. Indridi I. Kaldtsen on said:

    No prob, my pleasure. I’m almost certain that you’re right, it’s more than just a UFO crash. I heard something on Dark Matters Radio I think which sort of hinted at a nuclear angle to Roswell, btw. John Loftus says it was a spy balloon and the Soviets couldn’t care less, Annie Area 51 authoress says the Russkies were all over it. When in doubt, blame the Chinese!

    And a message for Greg-san:

    atashi wa anata ni ikutsu ka mury? de adobaisu o sa sete itadakitai to omoimasu. Nihonde wa, gyokairui o tabete wa ikenai. Gambate o kudasai!

    (captcha: Hubbard resedee, not a joke, although it rejected my initial response)

  13. Polterwurst on said:

    Hi. I’m german and I just wanted to say that Mr Bosley’s explanation for NYMZA or NJMZa sounds very implausible to me. “Zahlungsamt” means something like “payment office” and the term “Jagdflugzeuge” used in the 1850s sounds like science fiction. It’s the term that was used for interceptor airplanes much later. I guess if I ever read The Empire of the Wheel it will be as speculative fiction and with two sacks of salt. Btw. “the bell” probably was part of the Nazi’s nuclear weapons research and had nothing to do at all with flying.

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